Latest entries

NASA releases API for Open NASA Data

NASA as part of the Open Government Initiative has been opening up their servers, releasing petabytes of data to the public. This past week they made that data easier to access and use by releasing an API. NASA has a lot of data. For example, just one mission – the NASA’s Earth Observing System Data and Information…

Citizen Science Village at Open Science Summit

Dear Citizen Scientists, On Behalf of the Open Science Summit I would like to invite you to present your latest projects at this years Citizen Science Village. If you haven’t heard Open Science Summit is an amazing conference, with an impressive range of speakers from all fields of science. It’s actually 46.7% of the reason…

NIH Challenges You to Create Lessons About BioScience

The NIH has put forth a challenge to the nation, asking anyone and everyone to send in their best science experiments oriented for kindergarden up to 12th grade. They plan on picking the best ones and releasing the procedures for the public to use for free. Aside from their horrible choice of prizes (An electronic badge, really?) this is a great initiative and I can’t wait to see the resource that comes out of this.

Muskox Podcast

Photo Credit:U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service There’s a chill in the air this week as we travel to a mountain range in Norway in search of muskoxen, Ice Age survivors that once roamed the far north alongside the woolly mammoth. Introduced to Norway from Greenland in the 1940s, muskoxen flourished on these cool, dry slopes…

CheapStat: An Open-Source, “Do-It-Yourself” Potentiostat

A potentiostat is a wonderfully useful tool in the study of electrochemistry. However, their widespread adoption is limited primarily by their price, with research setups often costing up to $10,000 and barebone potentiostats still upwards of $1,000 (i.e. Dagan Chem-Clamp).  A group out of UC Santa Barbara have developed both the hardware and software necessary…

How to make quantum dots

Charlie Dvorchak(apologies if misspelt name) of John Hopkins University walks us through how to make Cadmium Selenide semiconductor nanocrystals, also known as a type of Quantum Dot. Caution: Cadmium Selenide is dangerous to human health, so be sure to take proper precautions if you choose to work with it. P.s. Just one cool possible use…